Research projects funded by the programmes Leibniz Young Investigator Grants and Wege in der Forschung II

The programme "Leibniz Young Investigator Grants" is the follow-up funding programme to the university's internal project funding "Wege in die Forschung II". The grants give excellent young scientists the opportunity to gain research experience independently through project coordination. A selection of funded projects can be found here:

SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS FROM 2018

  • Dr. Dorothee Bühler (Institute for Environmental Economics and World Trade)

    Title:

    Boon or bane of infrastructure investment in the Mekong Region – Using household panel and remote sensing data to analyze the effects for rural households

    Abstract:

    In the last decade the Mekong Region in Southeast Asia has made remarkable progress in reducing poverty. However, rural households continue to generate their income largely from agriculture and environmental resource extraction. In an effort to stimulate economic development and reduce poverty further, governments invest in infrastructure utilizing the natural resources of the Mekong River by building hydroelectric power plants. This expansion in infrastructure brings both benefits as well as challenges for rural households living along the Mekong. While households may benefit from better marked access, energy availability and economic growth it is unclear how the ecosystem changes affect rural livelihoods especially with regards to fish stocks and agricultural activity. The proposed research project aims to identify and analyze the effect of infrastructure developments along the Mekong River and its tributaries on small-scale farming and fishing households in Stung Treng, Cambodia. The project will use socio-economic panel data to analyze the effects of the infrastructure expansion and combine it with measures of environmental degradation and water pollution based on remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data. 

    Duration: 24 Month

  • Dr. Clemens Hübler (Institute of Structural Analysis)

    Title:

    Fundierte Metamodellbildung stochastischer, geregelter Strukturen am Beispiel von Windenergieanlagen (MetaWind)

    Abstract:

    Smart systems, which mostly come from the field of communication technology and which consist of a combination of networked, regulatable or controllable, sensory and intelligent subsystems, have been omnipresent in the media in recent years. Smart systems have actually been around for years in a wide variety of engineering fields. In civil engineering, for example, these are wind turbines with networked elements of measurement and control technology. For an economical and reliable design of these systems, their simulation is necessary. Due to the non-linear, stochastic and controlled behaviour of such systems, the required computing power can be uneconomically high. In this case, substitution models, so-called metamodels, can be used to approximate the system behavior. Although such metamodels are already widely used today, their accuracy and efficiency have been limited or at least scarcely comprehensively analyzed in complex systems. Therefore, this research project addresses this research gap and develops well-founded metamodels for wind turbines based on a comprehensive comparison of different variants.

    Duration: 24 Month

  • Dr.-Ing. Marc Müller (Institute for Multiphase Processes)

    Title:

    Patient-specific implants from autologous blood donations

    Abstract:

    Diseases of the cardiovascular system are the main cause of all deaths in Germany. However, an efficient therapy of diseased blood vessels with suitable implants still poses a great challenge. The available synthetic implants have limited biocompatibility and reproduce the mechanical properties of the native vessels only to a limited extent.

    The project aims at the development of a standardized and automated process for the production of patient-specific vascular implants using autologous blood donations. In the first phase, process steps will be developed which include separation of the blood components and lysis of the thrombocytes. The purified protein solution is processed into a highly porous tubular carrier structure using polymer processing techniques. A novel process for the biological cross-linking of proteins is integrated into the process. Based on suitable mechanical and biological test methods, the optimal process parameters are determined. The result is a completely autologous and therefore patient-specific implant with ideal biocompatibility and biomechanics. Finally, a concept for the production of a device is developed which carries out all process steps automatically. This forms the basis for translating the developed technology into clinical application and basic clinical research.

    Duration: 24 Month

  • Dr. Heike Wadepohl (Institute of Education for Special Needs)

    Title:

    Target child related interaction quality in child day care facilities (ZIK)

    Abstract:

    (Inter-)National findings on the discussion of the quality of early educational institutions identify the design of interactions and their quality in day-to-day day-care as an essential influencing factor on childhood social-emotional, motivational and cognitive developmental measures.

    There is increasing reference to concrete strategies and interaction formats, whose use in day-care centres should contribute to improving children's skills. Adaptive use of these strategies, tailored to the individual requirements of each child, is regarded as a central prerequisite for success in high-quality pedagogical work, particularly against the background of increasing heterogeneity and the associated different levels of development of the children in the kindergarten groups. It is therefore all the more astonishing that the current (quantitative) approaches to recording the quality of interaction take only little account of this individualised perspective on the individual child, but mostly assess the quality of interaction at the level of the child group and thus suggest that each child is involved in a similar number of interactions within the "group room" and benefits from them in the same way.

    This is where the ZIK research project aims to capture the quality of interaction from an individualized perspective. The aim is to characterise and compare the differential interaction quality in a group on the basis of the observation of individual children and to examine possible influencing factors on the part of the children, the specialists and the context on the respective interaction quality.

    Duration: 24 Month

SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS FROM 2017

SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS FROM 2016

SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS FROM 2015

SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS FOR THE YEARS 2008-2014

Successful Applications from 2014
Successful Applications from 2013
Successful Applications from 2012
Successful Applications from 2011
Successful Applications from 2010
Successful Applications from 2009
Successful Applications from 2008

CONTACT

Dr. Sonja Detay
Address
Brühlstraße 27
30169 Hannover
Building
Room
110
Address
Brühlstraße 27
30169 Hannover
Building
Room
110